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How to Aggregate Test and Quiz Scores

How to Aggregate Test and Quiz Scores


In this video you’re going to learn how to
aggregate test and quiz scores so you can learn more about what your students know. Okay, so you have a stack of tests or quizzes.
Right now, you might only be grading these, then entering the scores into your grade book. Chances are, you’ll probably go over the results
with students, but there’s one more step you might not be taking, something extra you can
do really fast with those tests to make sure the results work even harder for you. It’s called data aggregation, any process
in which information is expressed in summary form so it can be analyzed. Here’s how it works: Let’s say this is your
quiz. As many teachers do, you make an answer key
for it. Okay, so here’s your first quiz to grade.
It’s Jamie’s, and she has gotten one question wrong, number 2.
Now instead of just flipping Jamie’s test over and moving on to the next one, just go
ahead and put a tally mark next to number 2 on your answer key, and put another one
next to item a, the one Jamie chose incorrectly. Now let’s move on to the next quiz. Marcus got two questions wrong: Number 7 and
number 8. Okay, let’s record those, and we’ll mark down the answers he chose instead. Done with that. Here’s Holly’s quiz. She also got number 2
wrong, and she marked the same wrong answer as Jamie. Interesting. Let’s tally that over
on our answer key. Once you’ve finished grading all of the quizzes,
you have an aggregate, a summary of how each student answered every question that they
got wrong. This will tell you which questions were the most problematic and deserve the
most attention. You find that twelve out of your twenty-five
students have gotten number 2 wrong, and every kid who got it wrong chose carrot. This may
be a misconception, or it may just be a bad question. It probably confused the heck out
of your kids. If it were me, I would just give that point back to everyone. Question number 4 got a lot of wrong answers,
too, but notice that students chose a variety of incorrect answers, so that doesn’t necessarily
mean this was a bad question. It might just mean you need to do more review of this concept
with the students who got it wrong. However, because this was an “all of the above” question,
it’s possible that students simply didn’t read the whole question carefully enough.
When you go over the quiz results with students, find out how many students missed primarily
because they just weren’t careful. That information will help you decide how to proceed. For some questions, like this one, you may
find that very few or no students got it wrong. This probably just means that students have
mastered the concept. Turning all of this information into a summary does take a few more minutes
than simply marking your quizzes and filing them away, but considering the fine-tuned learning your
students will get from it, and the sense of control you’ll get knowing precisely where
student misunderstandings are, the extra few minutes is worth it.

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