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Engagement with soft skills: Using board games at the library…

Engagement with soft skills: Using board games at the library…


Welcome everyone thanks for choosing to
join me as I hope everyone can see clearly from this first slide we’re
going to be talking today about engagement with soft skills using board
games at the library to engage patrons and improve your career readiness and so
while I kind of give you a little background about myself and my
interest in games go ahead and type in the chat if you wouldn’t mind people who
have games at their library and I think I actually can see that I was gonna
tell you I won’t see them right away and I’ll just get it later but I have been
seeing your messages fly by so so a little bit about myself I have been
working in libraries since 1997 I started off in public libraries I
transitioned to academic libraries around 2004 where I worked at several
institutions until just this past year I started at the State Library in January
of 2019 obviously in a few of the public libraries I worked
we had some games not huge collections and I would say my impression in the
late 90s was any libraries who had them were definitely starting to phase them
out because of issues of keeping pieces in order and check-out complications and
things like that so I sort of unfortunately figured maybe that won’t
be something I’ll get to do in my career when I got into academia it was still
pretty new my first job was at Purdue University and right around 2006 there
was a conference that was put on in Chicago called it was a gaming learning
literacy symposium and our Dean sent like a massive amount of librarians up
there I unfortunately did not get to go but I learned a little bit about it some
of our librarians learned about it and we started talking about it at Purdue
my time there I didn’t really get a chance to develop a large collection but
I was able to go the next year and actually present was a great experience
I met some very interesting librarians including Jenny Levine and Scott
Nicholson who many of you may know started what was at the time national
game day because they wanted to break a record of playing the same board game in
in libraries across the world that has morphed and grown it’s now international
games a week and that was just early in November so some of you may have been
using games I’ve seen lots of people responding that they have games but at
my third academic library when I was finally able to convince the higher
powers to start purchasing games obviously we had to put a use case in
there and how they could be useful to students and faculty and so that’s
mostly what I’m going to talk about today
so first we’ll spend a few minutes to sort of defining the need and how I kind
of made that case I will then go very very briefly into board game mechanics
and how those can help us help prepare our patrons our users and how they can
improve the soft skills I’ll probably spend the bulk of time talking about
some examples I have a couple of screens of resources for you but it’s of course
not an exhaustive list and then if I didn’t see your message fly by during my
speaking I’ll spend some extra shot some time at the end answering any questions
and I’ll just warn you guys in advance that sometimes I can fly through stuff
so if I’m going to quickly definitely you know put something in the chat kind
of give me some cues so I can slow down or I can talk about something it’s such
great length that we might not get all the way through so definitely kind of
give me heads up if I’m doing either one of those things okay so what was the
need so first off the Society for Human Resource Managers SHRM like most
professional organizations and associations they conduct surveys of
their users all the time and so for years they’ve been surveying HR managers
and their impressions of the people they hired new in that past year so one thing
that they find consistently and so this is the executive summary and I’ve kind
of highlighted the wording they used but one thing they have found consistently
year in and year out is that new hires most come or HR managers report that new
hires most commonly lack or can’t apply soft skills and so I’ve kind of bulleted
them over here the five that come up most often so things like collaboration
or sometimes they call it teamwork being able to communicate with other
co-workers critically thinking about problems leadership and then just
problem solving in general and so of course in academia most professors focus
on the hard skills the stuff that they need from their particular field and
it’s really hard to teach soft skills and it’s kind of something that’s been
plaguing academic libraries and academic institutions for years but because I
have such a passion for games and I was sort of working with Career Service
folks at multiple institutions anyway on how to prepare students for job
interviews and job searching I sort of saw this natural fit that in many board
games and and other social activities you can develop these skills so I kind
of pitched it was able to buy some games and then really had to get faculty to
understand and use the games and I think we can do the same so for most of us I’m
guessing our public librarians I think we can sort of transition or use these
same concepts and for any academic librarians out there I’d love to talk to
you as well so first understanding how games are created and played can help us
make those connections so a board game mechanic is just kind of
a broad picture of how a game plays so if you’re reading a review online if
you’re reading something from the publisher and they use some of these
terms once you start to know them or if you’ve played a lot of games you kind of
start to see these patterns most games of course use more than one mechanic
typically one is sort of the dominant and they may have some other number of
secondary mechanics and so even someone who’s not a board game enthusiast
probably will relate to this example that Monopoly is often called a roll and
move game you roll the dice to move your piece that’s the primary mechanic but
there’s also a set collection involved obviously you have to get the right
properties in the right patterns to perform well in the game and there’s
also a little bit of economics involved so there are skills that can be picked
up in terms of you know having enough money and when to buy and sell and
things like that so understanding those mechanics or
knowing what mechanics a game might employ can help you tell a bit about
what soft skills they might help instill or reinforce or even foster in those who
play them so here are just a very very small list of some mechanics that are
used a lot recently the first is some is often called an area control mechanic
you can think of games like a Risk or Axis and Allies where the primary
function in the game is to control an area on usually a board a map or
whatever games that employ the area control mechanic definitely have many
other mechanics involved underneath and so just the nature of area control could
could relate to many of those soft skills
usually things like critical thinking and problems
solving but depending on how you’re supposed to control the area as the
player of the game you might have to communicate with the other players or
you might have to write notes to people or you might have to understand a
message someone else is trying to convey and we’ll talk about some examples of
that a little bit later my favorite mechanic is collaborative
mainly because I got tired of playing super competitive players and in a
collaborative game instead of all players being out for themselves it’s
usually that all of the people playing the game are working together as a team
and trying to beat the game itself and obviously the one that’s most easily
identified here is things like teamwork or collaboration but you can also see
leadership skills developing here communication skills and then usually
critical thinking or problem-solving or both depending on how the game works
some classic examples here I believe the picture that we started with was
Forbidden Island excuse me Pandemic if anyone’s heard of that one
and there are lots of others that have been coming out over the last few years
and collaborative can also be collaborative or semi collaborative so
if you’re going to do these in a library environment you might want to be aware
of games that have hidden roles and are only silent collaborative oh I just
completely blanked on the name of it but there’s at least one that I’ve heard of
and read about where you start the game off where everyone’s working together
and then partway through one or more players is actually going against the
rest of the people so while these sound interesting to me I could definitely see
where if you’re not careful yes Betrayal is definitely one of those
thanks Valerie it’s one of the Camelot games was what I was thinking of but
anyway so collaborative is my favorite mechanic but obviously there are
definitely some things you need to be aware of this you’re going to use these
programming or have them out for your patrons so collaborative was probably
the hot mechanic there’s you’re a couple of years ago it is slowly was replaced
by legacy games which I can talk about if anyone wants to but now one of the
sort of hot mechanics is roll-and-write so in a roll and move game like Monopoly
it’s pretty passive and there’s not much interaction with the other players but
in a roll-and-write game the active person rolls the dice or or does some
action and then everyone can look at that and make decisions based on it now
usually the person who’s active gets more power in the decision-making but
everyone gets to work off that and there are tons of examples in this new field
and I kind of yeah I kind of think about these as an interactive version of
Yahtzee some of them were basic in this in this genre
QuixxI believe was nominated it did not win a few years ago the major board
gaming award of the year but it was definitely up there and it’s very
similar to Monopoly you’re rolling some six-sided dice you’re adding them up and
you’re making decisions on them but as I said it’s not just me doing my thing and
you’re doing your thing totally separate and we just happen to be sitting
together you’re watching my rolls and trying to decide what you can do to
benefit from what I’ve rolled and I’m doing the same when it’s your turn
and finally worker placement games and and this is relatively broad but
basically the game presents a limited number of actions that is available to
all of us and after turn order has been determined the first person gets to
choose from all of them and then the next person chooses from one less and so
on and so on so there’s definitely some competition in these games there’s
definitely sort of critical thinking normally those actions are that where
you’re placing your worker get you stuff and then you need to collect the right
combinations of things to advance yourself through the game and I am going
to attempt this go out to the web and so this is a site that I put together at my
last academic library the PowerPoint well the slides will be shared the link
will be shared but here is where I have quite a few more game mechanics and
descriptions of how I think they can be used and which soft skills they can be
kind of tied to and then I try to do examples of each one okay so I’m gonna
jump back over here for now full screen there we go oops sorry about that okay
so examples and how this works so what we’re seeing here is a game called this
For $ale it is a very quick game it’s a deck of cards and some chips and you
really wouldn’t even need the chips as long as people can keep track of their
money and what they’re doing is they’re bidding on properties that are
represented by those cards in the first phase of the game they buy up all those
properties and then in the second phase of the game you lay out some checks and
you’re trying to get the highest value check by sacrificing one of your
properties so basically I spend my money to get it and then I sell it back I’m
trying to make a profit on each one it’s a really fun quick game I actually heard
students talking about return on investment when they were playing this I
mean they they sort of internalize the concepts of the course depending on what
course you use it in but in terms of soft skills again they are critically
thinking about each decision they make how much do I bid am I going to get
outbid when do I drop out of the auction and take a less valuable property but
save money for future so there’s a there knowledge they have but depending on the
number of players there’s there’s things removed from the game so they don’t have
perfect knowledge and games like this can be really powerful at those sort of
critical thinking skills they also had a lot of fun and interestingly enough the
professor I did this with because he was kind of a marketing guy he always wanted
there to be some stakes on online besides them just playing and having fun
and subconsciously absorbing these soft skills so he would typically allow the
winner a free pass on like an assignment or something like that but if you get
swag from conferences or you have other things obviously you could very easily
adapt something like this to you know the winners of games get their name and
a hat for some big prize if you only got one or they get library pencils or you
know tote bags or things like that there’s a lot of ways you could tie this
to the marketing of the library okay on the left we see a game called Know
Opportunity and this one was actually developed as an educational tool by a
teacher I believe she was a high school teacher I can’t remember where and
there’s an there is a thirty two week curriculum for this game now I never had
professors want to use the full curriculum in a college course but
basically they are entrepreneurs trying to start a company and in a very
Monopoly type fashion they have to move around this board and draw colors based
on those draw cards based on those colors and some of them you know forced
them to make an elevator pitch which is why the faculty member liked it about
their company some of them you know just give them a number to record on the
sheet either positive or negative something that happened to their company
and there are some squares on the board that allow them to sort of gamble on a
currency exchange so as their company moves
global they can choose whether they want to invest some of their money in a
country outside of their home country and maybe it pays off maybe it doesn’t
so again this one was truly a game designed for teaching but it was a lot
more fun than any of the types I’d seen growing up and it definitely tied to the
course again this was a marketing professor so he did a really good job of
tying this to you know creating your elevator pitches practicing them having
those ready and similar to that last game we talked about he wanted some
stakes on the line so instead of the games rules just say when you make those
sales pitches you just roll a die and see how much money you get from your
investor well obviously he wanted to add a more objective measure so he and I
were sort of like the Sharks on Shark Tank and we would decide how much that
pitch was worth so instead of randomness you could have them making presentations
to people or not or whatnot so this is a really good one both just for fun that
also kind of tied to high school and our college-level classes and then on the
right we have a sort of a bigger picture of the game we saw at the very beginning
this is Forbidden Desert it’s a collaborative game so the players are
working together and in this game everyone can perform a set of standard
action so moving around that board clearing the sand away exploring tiles
and things like that and then they each have a role that gives them a specific
action so because there’s a desert one of them is expert in character carrying
and storing of water and so that person plays a critical role in keeping the
group alive as the desert and the sun blare down and the storm rages and so
this is this and other collaborative games are probably one of the most
successful things I used in classes and is typically in a class for conflict
management so if you have groups who like to use your library or you have you
know employees who like to sort of talk about those sorts of issues this one can
be a really or other cooperative collaborative games can be a really good
to look at it and because it was a business level class instead of the
roles that are assigned in the game we modified them to fit roles in a company
so obviously that was the IT department there was the sales team there was the
executive team etc and so a game anyone who’s familiar with these probably knows
you can probably play from this designer from from the people who designed this
and others usually it you can lose as fast as 10 to 15 minutes if you get
really unlucky and usually it’s done in 45 minutes to an hour at the absolute longest every time I played one of these with her classes it usually took three
to four hours because the students would just talk so long and think out every
decision which was great from an academic sort of learning perspective
and in almost every class that we did this she had to stop them partway
through and talk about you know at the beginning of the the semester when we
all got together and you complained about how nothing got done into your
work environment and blah blah blah and then she could point out look you know
you guys aren’t letting anything get done because you’re not listening to
each other you’re not talking through the issues so there are there can be
some really powerful learning moments in games like these and again they are
collaborative so it can be a team effort and I’ve certainly read about and heard
about libraries and other sort of board game enthusiasts across the country in
the world who use them for competitions so you could have you know patron sign
up in groups of three or four play the game and create some sort of measure of
success now those measures of success usually
aren’t going to be built into the game itself but I’ve seen lots of tools
online that can allow you to kind of rate how well they went you know
obviously living or dying is one way you know winning the game or not but to
judge the difference between two teams that either won or lost there are tools
out there see oh the other interesting thing although it’s kind of interesting
but it’s but it’s also a caveat in games like this there is a problem some people
call it a problem that has been identified and it’s possibly why less
games are being made with this mechanic recently but some people call it
“quarterbacking” where one person tries to take over or maybe multiple people try
to control what others do so it’s good to have a discussion or at least make
the people aware of it if they’re going to play it in the library and then they
can possibly have a discussion before they play about how they want to address
those sorts of issues I mean the intent of these from everything I’ve read and
talked to most designers is that you work as a team and you kind of make
decisions together but ultimate decision for each thing is up to that individual
player but it’s definitely something to be aware of especially if you do have
multiple copies of these sorts of games that and if you have enthusiastic
players they can get a little loud ok this is another example of a
collaborative game Pandemic it’s possibly the best known it’s certainly
one of my favorite games and again in this one very similar everyone can do
the same basic 4 or 5 things and then they have specialties and you’re just
trying to control the spread of disease so in a good game like this you you can
get very immersed in the theme of the game and the time can go pretty quickly so here I think we have a much better
example this this group of students played it much more collaboratively I
don’t remember how long I took them but it was not like a four-hour thing that
should have only taken 35 or 40 minutes yes Walmart Target some others have
definitely picked up on on board gaming and there are several hot games that
appear Pandemic was one of them for several years I don’t know if it is
anymore but it’s definitely a game I really like okay and then this last
example probably the the granddaddy of board games not in terms of the entire
history of board games but in sort of re-sparking the passion of players here in
America and if you don’t recognize that this is Settlers of Catan
it is a highly successful game millions upon millions of copies i
believe were sold in Germany before it was sort of brought over sometimes
people just call it Settlers now but the reason I’ve got this one on here is
because this one not only do you have to communicate with people and you have to
sort of do some critical thinking on how you place your pieces in what you build
etc but you really can’t be successful at this game unless you trade with
people so you’ll see the cards kind of down here in front they represent your
basic resources you get those depending on where you have your little towns and
cities built so certain people might have a heavy majority if not a monopoly
on a certain resource and so everyone needs the same basic resources to build
the same components to score the points so it’s it’s a game that kind of forces
you even though you’re competing against one another to make trades and obviously
that requires not only problem-solving and critical thinking but
or value judgments and communication skills etc to try to work with the other
players to get a resource you may need and because it’s been around so long
there are tons of expansions and themed versions I believe there’s a Star Trek
Catan and probably a Star Wars Catan and other versions of it if your population
is more interested in those sorts of things okay better all right so moving
on oh wow the resources already see I didn’t get stuck in talking too much so
I’ll talk about a couple of these really quickly and then it looks like I’m gonna
have lots of time for questions the one I want to highlight on here the most is
probably Scott Nicholson’s “Everyone plays at the library” it’s almost in its
tenth year and this is a book that I wish I had read before I started
collecting board games now I didn’t see every chat that went by but it looks
like a lot of people have collections already which is awesome I am all for
that but at least in my own experience I started collecting and I started to try
to plan events and I got really low turnout and I think if I had read
through this book first I might have had more success so he does a great job of
doing a little bit of overview of games and some of the stuff I’ve just talked
about here mechanics and but he also talked about audiences and how to pick
things for the the audience you’re trying to engage with he talks about
events and whether you want to target one or two games versus lots of games at
the same event length of time how to market so it’s just a really good
resource for covering those types of things
obviously for any academic libraries or anyone who’s thinking about teaching
through games the last on there Andrew Walsh’s this book is interesting now
that one is less on traditional board games and more just on using game-like
activities but I believe he talks about board games as well it’s been a little
while since I looked at that one and then Brian Mayer and Christopher Harris
“Libraries got game aligned learning…” they are I believe school librarians and so
there’s an interesting perspective there on using them in the classroom in a much
more formal way than I ever did and usually for longer periods and since
they’re somewhere in the K through 12 realm it’s not a one-off like I was
doing in college and I know another big thing I didn’t talk about it today but
obviously many libraries are also allowing groups to use their space for
role playing D&D and other games so “The functions of role-playing games and how
to participate or how participants create community solve problems and
explore identity” is a really good resource for anyone who’s either
thinking about doing it or maybe has let it happen but wants to be a little bit
more purposeful about it there’s some great advice in that book and then
lastly I’ll mention just a couple of websites again I have a much longer list
for anyone who’s interested but if you want to learn about the games themselves
and their mechanics I would strongly recommend BoardGameGeek it has a great
searching and sorting tool where you can pick an audience that you’re targeting
either age or whatever you can pick a style of game you’re interested in you
can pick lots of different sort of checkbox type options and filter down
the I don’t probably in the tens of thousands of games that’s on there I
don’t know how many are now in there’s their database but it can help you
curate some lists to to maybe begin your investigation Meeple Like Us
is a really good blog slash website I’m not exactly sure how they identify
themselves but they deal with accessibility issues so if you either
have a game that you’re not sure or is not getting used or if you’re debating a
game purchase you may want to look at their write-ups obviously I’m sure they
have a much smaller list of games they have been able to review but when they
write their reviews they’re always basing it on the perspective of
accessibility so things like color blindness things like mobility font size
all sorts of things that you can use to maybe decide whether a game is
appropriate for either your library as a whole or for particular audiences and
then and this is a category that is growing every day I don’t have nearly
all of them mastered yet but if you are interested in learning how to play a
game without sitting down and reading through the rule book or if you have read the
rules and you just want to kind of hear someone who’s super into games explain
it and there are tons of these I guess vodcasts I don’t know what the right
term would be but people on YouTube who do this for a living and some of the
ones I like which are appropriate for all settings are WatchItPlayed and
GameNight! and GameNight! is basically some of the people behind that website
BoardGameGeek which was the first on the Internet to start categorizing and
cataloging board games the WatchItPlayed games or videos I should say
those are much more manageable ten to fifteen to maybe 20 minutes for just a
rules explanation he occasionally does playthroughs as well if you want to see
the whole game played out but GameNight! is almost exclusively playthroughs so
those can be an hour or longer depending on the game
but the nice thing about those is the first however many minutes 10 or 20
minutes are focused on the rules and how you set the game up and then they
however long it takes them to play it and then the last five or ten minutes
depending on the game are set up to be an overview of what they thought so
those are the resources at least that I wanted to highlight here I’ve got lots
more if anyone needs them but if anyone has any specific questions I am going to be happy to take those now no one
stopped me or slowed me down so I went through that pretty quickly
is there anything anyone wants me to go back over what board games do you recommend I saw
a partner I’m gonna jump back over here so I can see the full okay so starting
with I would actually probably read either through ILL or from someone else
maybe get Scott Nicholson’s book he has some good suggestions for where to start
but I think more importantly he has great advice on deciding what sort of
audience you want to focus on first and that will really help drive that
question so for example if I wanted to use my collection more for drop-in type
events I would pick games that played much shorter
I would pick games that were maybe a little easier to learn so things like
those roll-and-writes play really quick some of the party style games there are
a few of those Code Names and some others that can sort of be people can
drop in and out of if they want so if there are some people that are
interested in start the game and then people walk up and see it being played
obviously they could jump right in make the team’s bigger or they could – others
could leave and it would still work there there are many games that are like
that but if you were if you had either people you thought would be interested
or had gotten responses of you know more crunchy or heavy games which is a term
in the industry then you’re gonna look at something like and Catan is by no
means heavy or crunchy but obviously it’s quite a bit more to learn than you
know Quixx which is kind of Yahtzee on steroids or you know one of those party
games so things like Catan Agricola some of the more classics are good places to
start and then so we were playing oh yeah and
then yeah lots of card games it was a little hard to see because if I used
this watermark but in that opening screenshot on the title there were a
couple of card games that are both collaborative but they’re pretty fast to
play and several of them you’re not supposed to talk which is great for
libraries so there’s one called The Mind everyone has a hand of cards and the
first rounds of the game you have lower numbers of cards and as you progress you
get more and more cards and they’re simply numbered one to a hundred and
there’s only one of each so your objective without talking to anyone else
is to play what you feel is the lowest card and then the next you know next card
next card next card until you are out of cards and obviously if someone plays a
card and you had one lower that round is lost and you try again so there are
several games kind of in that genre quick card playing games some of which
are intended for you to be silent which is can be good for a library yeah I’m
seeing Munchkin that one’s great Exploding Kittens I’ve seen it I have
not played it but I’ve heard very good things about it so again I would say
it’s gonna be partially based on the audience you’re going for and partially
based on the amount of time you or your staff has to teach or whether you think
people can just learn it on their own and then whether you’re checking out or
not if you’re specifically hoping to foster some of those soft skills that I
was talking about you are going to look for games that use specific mechanics
and that website which I brought up briefly which will be shared out where I
started to document these when I was still at the academic library those
mechanics and many others you can find on BoardGameGeek and sort of fine games
that match those mechanics so anything that makes people have to make decisions
can do problem-solving or critical thinking anything that sort of
engages or requires people to talk to each other obviously or to draw so
pictionary can actually be used for communication in that you’re trying to
create something that they not only understand but that they can figure out
the the clue card from or whatever so you know lots of games and I would
contend almost any game can help foster at least one of those skills what else
do we got make sure you include instructions yeah
definitely I would make backups of instruction instructions who knows
you’re really really popular yeah absolutely
and if you haven’t seen it – come on over which Hasbro or Milton Bradley
whoever owns Uno has now created at least two variants one called Dos which
i have but i have not gotten to play yet and one called
was it Uno Twist or Twist Uno where the cards are double-sided
and you start the game on quote the easy side which is what we all remember and
think of as Uno and then but they’ve added a couple of cards that
force everyone to flip their hand over and then they play on the dark side it’s
light side dark side which of course i find funny but the draws get worse and
the wilds get worse and etc so yeah Uno can be can be a lot of fun yeah
there are tons of different Unos yeah mon cala yeah so the comments are coming
fast and I may not have seen them are there any other big burning questions because as I said at the beginning I can
talk about this stuff far longer than an hour if you all want me to blitz you
know do others have these games to use in the library or they check out so yeah
I mean I’d love to see what other people say about that I have seen libraries
that do both if you check out there are all sorts of things that you want to
consider and I’m certainly not an expert in that but I would definitely talk to
others who do allow them to check out for years I know one method was to weigh
the games but I’ve heard recently that that’s not the best way because
depending on time of year and humidity levels that weight might be different I
mean one you need a super-sensitive scale and two the humidity level can
change the weight of the game especially if it’s a game that has lots of
cardboard pieces that can kind of absorb the moisture oh yeah The Mind is the one I have yeah
and there’s another one from the same publishers I believe it’s called
The Game it’s very similar but it’s got a couple of twists in it but the same kind
of thing where you’re not the communication amongst players is very
limited if not no talking at all and I guess because people are asking
who has what and how they do it I mean anyone who attended the annual report
workshop or last week or the week before may have seen there was a very minor
change in one of the questions that sort of asked about other things you collect
and board games was an option there I mean I would love to have a better
survey of what everyone in the state does so that’s our first very tiny
attempt at learning that sort of thing but I’m definitely going to go through
the chat transcript at the end of this and kind of collect all your responses
and I can share that out with the group yeah Carcassonne is great for strategy it
can play quickly for anyone who’s not familiar that’s a tile what’s called a
tile laying game which certainly was an innovation when it first came out and
you draw tiles blindly and you play them one at a time
and you’re building the map as you go or building the board as you go which is
kind of interesting and there’s some basic characteristics they either have
parts of the city or roads or whatever and as you play a tile you’re allowed to
put one of your little people on it so that’s where the work replacement aspect
comes in as well so there’s a lot of thinking in that game if you get really
good at it and you have a limited number of people so obviously they don’t score
for you until certain things are triggered by the tiles games it’s
circulate check by staff yeah checked by staff is probably
unfortunately the best way to do it I went to a conference in Wisconsin last
May and definitely the public libraries up there who talked about it I think
we’re all in agreement with that as well that the weighing method isn’t great the
so you really really have to just go through games and check them Sequence
yeah that’s a good one Werewolf for anyone who’s not aware
that’s sort of a secret role game so everyone is is secretly given a role
at the beginning of the game either villager or werewolf and some versions
have multiple different variations on those and then it’s one I think everyone
is supposed to close their eyes or in some way hide their their hide the
knowledge and then then the werewolves while everyone else is quote asleep make
sure they all know who those players are excuse me and then you go around and the
villagers you’re trying to guess who the werewolves are before they all get
killed and yes there are lots of variations on that I’ve heard of
werewolf games at conferences and conventions that have like up to a
hundred or more players in them which can get really interesting I’m not sure
I would do that in a public library but unless it was outside that might be fun weigh unless it’s seriously off yeah and
that certainly could be a good quick check I’ve just heard some people
comment on it yeah Gen Con definitely would have large
werewolf games that’s for sure oh I’m so jealous Janice hopefully I’ll get to go
this year yeah and for anyone who’s doing this
sort of stuff if you want to talk to me offline I’m putting together a proposal
for Gen Con so if anyone’s doing some interesting or unique things with their
with their collections I’d be happy to talk about that off offline because yes
as Jennifer mentions trade day is for librarians and educators and it’s mainly
presentations like this one where you can learn about and you can also learn
from the publishers and companies as well GenCon is the oldest and largest
gaming convention in the country it started off much more focused towards
role-playing games now it’s probably 50/50 role-playing and board games or
maybe even heavier on board games now I’m not sure what the exact breakdown is
and for the first 20 ish its it just has like 50 second or fifty third
anniversary and for the first 20 or so years it was up in Wisconsin where D&D
was born but it’s been in Indy now for a long time I’m not sure how long it’s
been in Indy oh that’s good to hear Jennifer I may talk to you about how you
did your presentation yeah at least 25 years in Indy that sounds about right it’s called trade day it’s the Wednesday
before the official conference starts and for good or for bad you can sign up
for trade day but you’re effectively buying a pass for the entire conference
since it’s geared at librarians and educators I would love it if they would
just have a price where you only paid for trade day but you know but you do
get a fifth day out of it if you’re going to do the whole thing while the
questions and comments are going I will just go ahead and remind everyone that
the LEU certificate is in the top box in the middle of the screen so don’t forget
to download that my contact info is at the bottom as I’ve said a couple times I
will kind of curate this chat and definitely get a record of who has stuff
and who doesn’t and maybe even the names of games that are mentioned and some of
those kinds of comments how people are using them do a quick tally of that and
I can share that out with the list of participants if that’s what you all want this has been a great webinar well thank
you yeah any other last questions oh I see you’re paying so I could get the
four days at 200 or I could get trade day at 200 and get the rest for free
cool but yeah it’s it is a bonus and and it
is very good from what I’ve heard from lots of librarians and educators I’m sure the state would like to hear
that Jennifer thank you I might get reimbursed have many of you
participated with international games a week I guess out since we’ve got a few
extra minutes I’ll definitely ask that Janice I believe librarians and
educators do get a sneak peek at the the vendor area sort of first crack for
seven years awesome not anymore okay oh but I don’t anymore darn it okay
nevermind Janice unless you’re retail huh oh well
so yeah international games week is usually early November I don’t want to
jinx it yet but I’m pretty sure I’ll be on the committee to plan that next year
so if anyone has comments or questions or concerns about it I will definitely
take that to the group and if you don’t know anything about it it’s a one week
celebration of games and libraries it’s now international as the name would
suggest and usually I have heard that in the past if you sign up early enough you
get either some free games or you get registered to four drawings yes six
programs 180 that’s awesome you’re welcome Jerry all right well I think I’m officially
done I’ll kind of hang out here in the room for a little while longer if there
are last-minute questions but I just want to thank everyone for attending
today I know date before Thanksgiving may or may not have been the best timing
but I’m glad you all signed up and and joined us and look look out for the link
to the recording later and like I say I’ll try to sort of collate the chat
transcript and get any of the important details out to everyone

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