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Fieldsports Britain – Thermal fox shooting

Fieldsports Britain – Thermal fox shooting


[Music] Welcome to Fieldsports Britain. Coming up
I am going ferreting on lovely downland in merry old England I’m meeting a man who reckons
he’s got the biggest partridges in Britain. First it’s our own creature of the night its
Roy Lupton and he’s out foxing As you can probably tell Roy is a giver and
not a receiver. For Roy, it’s charity, not chastity. He performs acts of kindness wherever
he goes and never says ‘no thank you, that will be a bit uncomfortable’. In this case
it’s Hampshire, and a shoot where he had fantastic sport last season. To repay the generosity of the shoot owner
Roy has offered to do some hi-tech foxing to get on top of some of the trickiest customers
in the county. We are going to be completely covert tonight
and we using every single bit of night vision kit and technology that we’ve got in the hope
that we can catch up with a few of them, we know there’s three at least three foxes on
here that as soon as the lamp touches them they are away so with a little bit of mouth
calling , with a little bit of electronic calling and with the use of all the night
vision with fingers crossed we’ll be able to get on top of them The pheasants and partridges are being hit
hard and the keepers are having trouble contending with educated animals. And there’s only one
way to deal with that – night vision – plus a splash of thermal imaging too. It doesn’t take long to find our first couple
of foxes. 30 seconds actually just across the road from the yard – But they ain’t shifting,
regardless of the calling by Darren and Roy. Before we need to make the decision on which
one to take there’s movement to our left. This one isn’t stopping. [Music] You can see the beam of the Nightmaster illuminator
that sits on top of Darren’s rifle moving to pick up the fox. Usually Roy is the one looking down the optics-
but tonight he is one of the three blind mice while it’s Darren who is Cats’-Eyes Cunningham. Well that one worked absolutely superbly,
not quite as we thought it would pan out, but it’s odd for me being on the other side
because normally I’m up on the rifle. It’s actually quite nice just squeaking and driving
around it’s nice not having the pressure of shooting as well. All right. There we go,
very very nice sized dog fox so put him in and I’m sure that might be the last one for
tonight. First impressions would suggest a plague of
foxes making this shoot their home. NV gives us a definite advantage, so does thermal imaging
and we have both tonight. Our next fox comes from way off. Darren knows there is a job
to be done here and we’re not going to risk losing this one for the sake of the camera.
He shoots as it sits out at 230 yards. [Music] Let’s have a look at that one then, that’s
another good fox, you’re breeding them big down this way, aren’t you ? They’re feeding
well on your pheasants aren’t they. Gee whiz that’s another decent sized dog isn’t he?
Beautiful fox absolutely beautiful and Darren pulled off a really nice shot on that so you
could hear the bullet going so there was a good, a good pause between strike and when
the bullet left, but again just another very very nice large dog fox. They are certainly
being bred big down this way and as I just said to the estate owner I think he’s been
feeding them far too well on his pheasants and partridges but that didn’t go down too
well. Roy mixes up the calls – changing between
mouth squeaks and the Western River electronic call. We pick up eyes way in the distance – but
no matter what we have to offer they’re a nervy lot. We’re setting up the call out here now and
what we’ve got is we’ve got the one that I’ve downloaded which is a cleaned out vixen call
which I’m hoping might work tonight because I’ve heard a few foxes already start to mate
so we’re only in November but they’re already starting to kick off. We set up in what would normally be dead cert
situations but we’re starting to work hard for our Charlies. We end up back where we started – and there’s
a set of eyes along the bottom hedge – Darren doesn’t mess about. It’s hard hit but we can’t find it. I got a lovely whiff of it just then Not all our kit is cutting edge. If we struggle,
Roy is going to try squeaking using this high-tech device. Maybe we’ll save that for another
day! It is now about midnight and nothing is responding.
We spend a good ten minutes trying to play this fox – but it’s fruitless – or so we think.
We swing around and bump into this chap coming towards us. You need eyes in the back of your
head in this job. Maybe we ought to get Darren working on a fox early-warning radar system.
Or at least eating more carrots. Another dog, oh dear and another one so at
least we got that one a bit closer for you, eh ? We struggle on for another couple of hours
and we see nothing – it is one of the first cold November nights so maybe they’ve gone
to ground. However considering the odds were against
us we did OK: Darren bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, Roy, flying blind, and between them employing
the kind of technology you need for tricky foxes, including the rubber chicken. Night night. Roy Lupton out there on a very dark night
and now for our own dark Knight. It’s David on the Fieldsports Channel News Stump. [Music] This is Fieldsports Channel News. The RSPCA has dropped yet another case against
a pack of foxhounds. The animal rights charity wanted to use covert
surveillance from the League Against Cruel Sports to prove that Ledbury huntsman Will
Goffe had been hunting a fox. This is the fourth failed RSPCA hunt prosecution this
year. The Countryside Alliance calls the RSPCA’s latest case “harassment dressed up as legal
process”. If ever there was an argument against taking
headshots, it’s this deer from the USA. Although the arrow was causing the animal no great
distress, it serves as a reminder how easy it is to miss with a headshot. Instead of
shooting the animal, local wildlife officials tranquilised it, removed the arrow and released
it straight back into the middle of the deer hunting season. Not his day. The indefatigable Eddie Nash from the Lamping
Foxes Facebook page has a new call. Search Facebook for Lamping Foxes to find out about
the Nasher Fox Call. Recently we showed you the 3D printer and
how you can make a gun from plastic. Now there’s 3D printing in metal, which raises both hopes
and fears that it won’t be long before you will be able to print yourself a pair of Purdeys.
A company called Solid Concepts has brought out a method of 3D printing by layered powdered
metal and setting it with a laser. Now do you make the best sloe gin? To celebrate
the famous sticky drink favoured by shooters, the Feathers Hotel in Woodstock, Oxfordshire
, is holding a competition for the best sloe gin in the UK. Entries close on Monday 18th
November 2013, judging is on 29th November, and there is an open public day on 30th November.
Visit Feathers.co.uk And finally, a party of fishermen in Alaska
spent four hours freeing a 16ft killer whale which was stranded on rocks. Waiting for the tide to come in, they threw
water over the animal to keep it cool and when it began to lose strength and started
coughing, they stuck oars under its pectoral fins and pried it into the water. It righted
itself, took a deep breath and was off. So no explosives required this week ! You are now up to date with Fieldsports Channel
News. Stalking the stories, fishing for facts. [Music] Thank you David. Now I’ve been off to see a man who wants to
introduce a new game bird to the south of England and they’re a real Bustard. Between the middle of the 19th century and
the early 21st, the heaviest wild breeding bird in the UK was the mute swan at around
11kg or not far off two stones. The previous contender was the great bustard, which our
forebears hunted to extinction in Britain in the 1840s. In 2004, a retired policeman from Wiltshire
hatched a plan, and later an egg, which raised that weight by nearly half. Words like sustainability
and conservation are now part of the language of shooting. David Waters and his team are
trying to right the wrongs of the past by trying to bring back this bustard. They are
going to extraordinary lengths- getting eggs from Russia to start with – plus there’s the
red tape. They are a class 1 red data book species in
Russia , like the same legal status as the Siberian tiger so it’s literally a box full
of licenses to get the birds out of Russia and similarly a fair old bit of paperwork
and bureaucracy on the UK side to be able to release them. So I think it was about six
years after I started the project that we actually released the first birds David became interested in the great bustard
as a boy – maybe because you can say BUSTARD with gusto and get away with it. Since then
he has also become fascinated with muskets but that’s another story… Back to the bustards
and he’s made it his mission to succeed where others have failed. His reintroduction programme
is dependent on the Russian farmers. We are only allowed to collect eggs from nests
which have been destroyed by agriculture and if it’s a very dry season they can actually
get on and cultivate most of the fields before the bustards have laid, so it’s a good year
for the Russian great bustards but it’s a bad year for the UK project . I think the
highest number I’ve ever had in the year has been thirty two, but we have had several years
when it’s just been six birds Foxes are a problem for younger birds but
David says that, as they mature, bustards can out-manoeuvre foxes. This young one is
especially feisty. But each bustard is a precious commodity and needs protecting, especially
as the males don’t become fertile until they are five years old. Unlike sort of most of the game birds great
bustards are long lived birds. A male will live for twenty years plus, a female somewhere
in the mid teens and they are pretty much predator proof so an unsuccessful couple of
years can actually be catastrophic for grey partridge, but for great bustards you’re look
over the next en, twelve or fifteen years so we can afford a bit of time to watch the
population grow. Thanks to dedication dedication, dedication,
David is hoping to achieve a sustainable population of bustards in the next few years, but I doubt
they’ll make it back on to the quarry list in his lifetime. If you want to find out more
go to GreatBustard.org From big birds to a bright beautiful day in
November in merry old England on downland. Let’s go underground and go ferreting. Jaf calls it rabbitopia – and that’s why we’re
here. Mark ‘Jaf’ Jafferson is a leading light in the South Somerset Ferreters, a group
of families and friends who get together at weekends not to do anything dull like play
football or go shopping, but to go ferreting. So he is always on the lookout for the new
Watership Down. And there is no doubt, as we set out the nets, this place looks perfect. Nets are in a bit of a mess here . Yeah don’t
know who packed them up last time, but, well I do but I can’t mention any names on camera
really. Jefferson… Paul Jefferson my brother, I’ll
blame him because he’s not here. What’s the plan? Catch as many rabbits as we can really. Yeah.
And then we always like to try and do a good job for the farmer. But these rabbits they’re
pretty clever, been here for two thousand years haven’t they. You are about to be out smarted by a rodent
you know that. Yeah, I blame the Romans for bringing them
over. Yeah, I mean when we pulled up this morning, there’s rabbits everywhere. Plenty
of action so hopefully if we don’t get a bag of 50 today, I’ll be quite surprised. Hopefully,
fingers crossed. You know The long nets, the gate nets and the purse
nets out, it’s now a question of standing around to wait… and wait… and wait. The
first action is not what we want. One ferret comes out of the bury looking like it’s been
in a nasty fight. Whether he’s come across a stoat or, don’t
know, I’ll put him back in the box I think. One anti-septic spray later and the ferret
is retired from the action today and put in a nice warm box in a vehicle. Back to the
Western Front, and it’s still all quiet. Then a rabbit comes out. Jaf is a bit depressed. Today has not gone
according to plan. However, we have seen some rabbits lolloping about next to an unpromising
looking bramble bush a bit further down the valley. Well he called it a rabbitopia and he said
fifty rabbits. Not quite fifty rabbits which is why we’ve moved here. We set up the nets again. Today is about nets
and dogs. The dogs you want to be fast and vicious killers. Well, you want the nets to
be fast and vicious catchers, so Jaf chooses them carefully. These are the purse nets we use, got these
from Bridport nets down in Bridport. Yeah I’ve been there for a long long time all the
fishing nets and like they’ve supplied the fishing industry for a long long time. These are a 10z three foot net. Basically
brilliant. I don’t like hemp nets myself because hemp will rot away. These you can pack away
damp, as long as you don’t leave them all summer damp in a bag they’ll be fine. But
certainly from week to week they’ll last forever. Hemp rots. These won’t. This spot turns out to be much better. Maybe
that’s the problem with ferreting. You have a system of buries as big as the London Tube
network and the ferrets just run round in circles underground chasing rabbits. You need
a shallow bury to get the rabbits out into the fresh air and into the jaws of the dogs. Not all the ferrets want to come back to the
surface. Even a bury this size has lots of chambers with lots of yummy things in them.
The gang use the ferret-finders and occasionally locate a ferret that has killed a rabbit underground
and is stuck behind it. In the old days, you would poke a bramble branch down the hole
to see if it came back with fur on. Now you use an endoscope, which gadget-man Jaf deploys
to discover that, in this case, that’s exactly what happens. Rabbit removed and the ferret
is free. We end the morning with lunch. Jaf once again
rides to the rescue with a jenny, a microwave and some of his venison and pigeon pasties. And here we have today’s top prize. It’s possible there’s too much oil in the
mixture, which suddenly turns our ferreting film into something out of The Highlander. Still the pasties taste good, if slightly
of two-stroke. And after lunch, there is one more burst of action. So a dozen rabbits by the end of the day,
a lost ferret which Jaf retrieves the following morning by leaving out a box and a dead rabbit,
and the injured ferret makes a full recovery. If you want to find out more about Jaf and
the gang, search Facebook for South Somerset Ferreters. And if you want good nets, go to
BridportNets.co.uk. And now the map that matters . Its Calendar. [Music] Welcome to this week’s calendar in association
with BASC with dates for you diary, smartphone, tablet and filofax. It’s the woodcock moon this Sunday, 17th November
2013. The second full moon in November is traditionally the date the big wave of woodcock
coming over from Europe to the UK. And everything is looking good for that migration. Temperatures are dropping and ice is spreading
west across the map from Russia. Meanwhile, the UK has settled into its annual position
of being in the brunt of the prevailing south-westerly winds, which are carrying band after band
of rain with them. If the temperature drops enough, this could turn to snow. The woodcock stay ahead of the ice – but have
to fly into the winds – in search of soft mud where they can probe for worms. On the sporting front, the rest of the gamebird
seasons are at their height and the hind and doe culls are underway. Now turning to rural events, and BASC’s website
lists the following: If you are interested in deer, there is a
stalkers’ evening on Thursday 14th November 2013 near Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk. There are two ladies’ shoot days this Saturday
16th November. BASC is holding a Lady Members’ Driven Game Day at Catton Park, South Derbyshire.
And the Shotgun & Chelsea Bun Club is clayshooting at Nottingham & District Gun Club in Nottinghamshire. The rest of the events are about eating game.
On Thursday 14th and on Friday 15th, there are Dining Room Game Nights in Ashbourne,
Derbyshire. Also on 15th and also in Derbyshire, there is a Taste of Game Dinner Evening at
The Butler’s Pantry in Mickleover. On Saturday night there is a Game Gourmet
Evening at The Pheasant Restaurant in Co Down, Northern Ireland. And next Wednesday, 20th November, Kent Cookery
School is holding a Venison Demo & Dine Evening. For more information please go to the BASC
website and click on the events tab. [Music] Now to the wilder world of hunting, shooting
and fishing on Youtube. It is Hunting YouTube. [Music] This is Hunting YouTube, which aims to show
the best hunting, shooting and fishing videos that YouTube has to offer. Let’s start with birds. Grouse Revenge is
a short film designed to promote GoPro cameras. Nice to see a big company embracing shooting
sports. The protagonists here are shooting grouse – and shooting with cameras – on a
moor in North Yorkshire in the UK – and the final frame has a grouse cracking the rib
of the shooter. Jacob Hurt is spreading the word on the Facebook
groups about his new channel CabinOutdoors. This film is Illinois Goose Hunting 2013 Bean
Field, an evening goose flight in Northern Illinois, USA. Go and see what you think. The Norwegian Hunter is not someone who hunts
Norwegians but someone who enjoys a variety of other unusual shooting sports. Here’s one
he sent me that you don’t see in many countries. He is after seabirds from a boat with a 12-bore
shotgun. JensenFlyFishing wears out boot rubber looking
for the best scenery in which to fish. This film is all a bit dreamy and all about the
American yearning for what they call a spring creek and what we call a mountain stream or
‘burn’. The schmaltz aside, it is a lovely film about stalking trout. From light tackle for pretty little fish to
Carp Fishing At Thorney Water – A Day Ticket 30lber. Chris Westley•reviews a British
day-ticket carp fishery that’s got more weed beds, gravel bars and sunken barges than my
daughter’s goldfish aquarium. Our viewer Gun – Nut recommends the ONeillOps:ProStaff
channel, which is heavy on the tactical. I have picked Predator Hunting Suppressed™:
Lost In Translation, where Mr ONeillOps is calling in and taking superb long-range shots
on coyotes in South Dakota while living out a slightly dodgy military sniper fantasy. Now, to save a red squirrel in the UK, you
shoot a grey. Here’s Air Gun Red Squirrel Hunt II which, palpitating British shooters
will be pleased to hear, takes place in the USA. And it’s Tamiasciurus hudsonicus, a different
species to our Sciurus vulgaris. Thank you Mr Attenborough. Finally, here’s a wonderful public information
film. Bear Spray Demonstration for Hunters is by the big-game superstar Craig Boddington.
He gives a one-minute demonstration on how to carry and use bear spray while hunting
in a film produced, of course, by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee. I hope I get gigs
like that when I am older. You can click on any of these films to watch
them. If you have a YouTube film you would like us to pop in to the weekly top eight,
send it in via YouTube or email me the link [email protected] Now we have a couple of plugs for our own
films this week. The first is a new series on Saturday nights from the USA. Headhunter Chronicles with Jason Bruce has
been on US network TV and now it is on Fieldsports Channel. Jason is calling and hunting an enormous
bull elk in California with the bow during the elk rut. But first he has to get past
the rest of the herd to take the shot. And then there are the pig – Jason can’t resist
wild pig. Click on the link on the screen to watch it. In this week’s Schools Challenge TV, we visit
the home of British shooting at Bisley in Surrey. It hosts events and competitions throughout
the year and is headquarters for shooting organisations including the British NRA and
the CPSA. Again, click the link to watch our film. Well we are back next week when I’ll be in
Yorkshire and the Carribean and if you’re watching this on Youtube don’t hesitate to
hit the subscribe button somewhere round the outside of the screen or go our webpage www.fieldsportschannel.tv
where you can click to like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter, or scroll down to
the bottom over on the right, you’ll see the constant contact page where you’ll be able
to pop your email address in and we will constantly contact you about our programme that’s out
7pm UK time every Wednesday. This has been Fieldsports Britain.

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