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PowerScore’s Live Online LSAT Course Preview: Pure Sequencing Games

PowerScore’s Live Online LSAT Course Preview: Pure Sequencing Games


alright guys it’s a few minutes past 8 o’clock Eastern and 5 o’clock out west so it’s time to get started here for lesson 1 of the power score live online course as you guys can probably tell with the little blue microphone next to my name that I am Eric I am going to be your lead instructor for the next 10 lessons and joining me we actually have the pleasure of having two co-instructors both Chris and Rachel very very talented very very competent instructors they are definitely going to be your primary point of contact here for questions we pride ourselves on making sure you guys get your questions answered that we are always here as you guys noticed tonight we’re always here a few minutes before somebody will be and always will stick around for a few minutes after class to get any outs the any questions the answer that you guys may have as well okay guys so getting into the pure sequence again so this is a specific game type really guys you could probably head this under the broader game type of a linear game probably over half of logic games fall into this linear category which is really just about ordering variables into some kind of a sequence or order we call it pure sequencing because it’s really kind of describing these games it’s the games that have purely sequential rules in them right these are probably among the most monochromatic types of games that you have because they’ll just keep hammering away with the same kind of rule over and over it’s a rule that talks about the relative position of variables with respect to each other as opposed to ordering rules about the absolute position of variables where they have to be or can’t be locking them in place next to each other or something like that we don’t see that typically from pure sequencing games it’s more of these er words like faster slower taller shorter so it is about ordering these variables but where are they relative to each other okay how we represent these pure sequencing rules or these sequencing rules is just simply a – and imagine this game guys is we are ranking these variables you know say one to five or something like that fastest to slowest ranking them by speed okay so if we got a rule that said Paula is faster than Tye and slower than Sarah okay well that means in this sequence Sarah is to the left of Paula who is to the left of time and that’s exactly how you would read these dashes if you could read it faster than and faster than but really visually it’s Sarah is to the left of Paula is to the left of time we want this sequence to match up with how we orient our diagram now number two brings up a very important point that unless it is otherwise ruled out and it has to be specifically ruled out there is the possibility of ties okay so if you have a rule that says djaro is not faster than miles that doesn’t mean Java was necessarily slower than miles okay so to accommodate that that possibility of ties guys we just would do instead of just the dash we do this double dash that kind of looks like an elongated equal sign but we would read this as miles is to the left of or equal to Java so if they haven’t specifically ruled out ties you would have to allow for that possibility now most games I will say this guys most games do explicitly rule out ties but you can’t assume that they’re ruled out you have to wait till the game actually says it that’s the trick now number three and this is a good rule of thumb for logic games generally always look for rules that involve common terms okay shared terms because odds are you can probably connect those rules and make inferences based on those connections so we’ve got the miles is faster than or equal to Jeru that’s pulled from above but if miles is also slower than Noguchi well that means the guchi is faster than miles who is faster than or equal to Java and so that would be that would allow you to therefore make the inference here that Noguchi would have to be faster than job because of that chain that you’ve drawn number four always keep an eye on the limits of the game who can be fastest who could be slowest basically who can be first and last two reasons for that guys number one the first and last positions tend to be more restricted than other positions so there seems to be tends to be more inferences about them and secondly they like to ask a lot of questions about the first and last position so you’re anticipating where questions are very likely to go now as we get into number 5 6 & 7 guys this starts to slow down a little bit because these are a bit trickier patterns that can come up with in sequencing games so number 5 be careful with rules such as this tie is faster than both Vernon and Wendy and it’s very easy because of the the order in which those terms are presented in that wording to draw this rule something like so that tie is faster than both Vernon and Wendy because Wendy was written after Vernon it’s easy for your brain to kind of go here but this isn’t what they’re saying right tie is faster than Vernon that’s true and tie is faster than Wendy that’s true but we don’t actually know the relationship between Vernon and Wendy so that’s the big problem here so you want to make sure if they give you a rule like this that you draw it appropriately so that you’re not gonna make any inferences that don’t exist so that’s where we come in with this what we call the double branched vertical the example and V and W are kind of written parallel to each other that there’s no line connecting them so you’re not wanting to impart a relationship between them that doesn’t necessarily exist okay and that can go both ways as you see here and in fact it can even you can get to like triple and quadruple branch examples if it says verdant Wendy and Ozzy are all faster than Thai well you’ve got all these connections of each of these variables to Thai but you want to make sure you’re not drawing any connections between them because we really don’t know the order of them so again it’s about knowing what you know and drawing that in but making sure you’re representing the rule in a way that you’re not inferring things that don’t exist now number six this is actually gonna be pretty common to see things like this you often will get games in which all of the rules are most of the rules at least will chain together into some pretty big massive sequencing rules so here the first rule sara is faster than Paula who’s faster than Tye second rule says Thai is faster than Noguchi last rule says Noguchi is faster than miles and then this third rule says miles is either faster than or equal to Joffrey so all of that links up like so okay but now let’s say you get like a local question that says well what if Vlad is faster than Thai okay well if you’re trying to make the proper inferences from that guys you got to make sure and represented accurately so fraud is faster than tie make sure you draw another basically a double branch vertical off of this chain and if what is faster than tied that definitely proves that he’s faster than all these people that are also slow at the time so we can make those inferences legitimately but you got to be careful in how you draw this because even though faut is faster than tie where is he in relation to Paulo or Sarah he could be before both of them he could be in between them he could be after them we really don’t know and we want to make sure again that we draw that rule in a way that we don’t make inferences that don’t exist then lastly guys in this number seven we’re not gonna see this in the games that we have here tonight but this is one of the trickiest I would definitely make a note of this guy’s this is one of the trickiest I think patterns you will see in any pure sequencing game so make a note of it this is also one you may have to come back and watch on the recording here but at first glance I think what’s so tricky about this guy’s is at first glance it seems pretty straightforward so say you have a rule that says B is faster than D or LC is faster than D banaba and I’m gonna say here guys let’s say that they did explicitly say no ties for this to work they would have to okay so that’s let’s imagine that’s there now first glance this is why I said it’s easy most people would just draw it like this and say okay pretty straightforward it’s B before D or at C before D seems easy enough but there’s a little bit more than meets the eye to this rule because of this final clause it’s saying it’s one or the other but not both and what that implies is is that if you are one you’re not the other so in let’s take the first scenario let’s say B is faster than me well that’s going to prove that C is not faster than me right and if there’s no ties then what does that really mean guys what a/c is not faster than D equate to if no ties are allowed it’s going to say that D has to be faster than C okay and so if being is faster than D that implies D is faster than C and so we can put that actually on the end of that chain like so meanwhile in the other scenario if C is faster than D this phrase implies that therefore B wouldn’t be faster than D and again as I said before if that is true and there are no ties that would equate to D would have to be faster than B and that we could put on the end of the second chain and even though you still don’t know which one is going on guys the one universal truth about both of those is that D is always in between two people and that would tell you the D can never be first or last no matter what and that is a big inference that’s almost always tested in games that have that pattern it’s not very common I will say this guy’s number seven is not that common not a not a very strong likelihood that you would see it on your test but let me say this if it comes up in a sequencing game pretty much a guarantee it’s not an easy game may not be a hard game but it’s not easy it’s at least middle difficulty and secondly this rule is going to be a pretty big driver of what’s going on in the game the last two are pretty quick number eight just you know you’re usually just gonna see a collection of sequencing rules in these games guys but every now and again they’ll throw in this other rule that may not be sequencing something like Wendy can’t be fastest just toss that in well one way to deal with that is to just circle wendy is kind of a special variable within the game that it has this outside restriction almost like kind of tied a little string around your finger don’t forget but usually you’re not going to see more than one or two variables that have that so that’s just kind of a quick way to to remember number nines a big one for me I have to get up on my soapbox for number nine because they say it here the key to superior performance on sequencing games but I guys I’d really highlight this because I’m taking out the word sequencing I would say this is the key to superior performance on games period and the book points it out or calls it avoid making unwarranted assumptions and I agree with that but I think there’s it may be a simpler way to say it guys but the way I would describe this is the key to superior performance on games guys it’s not about seeing every single inference that the game presents to you or that is available to you obviously throughout this process we were trying to see more and more inferences and be better and better at that but what kills you in a logic game is not the inference you didn’t see it’s the inference you made that didn’t exist okay so you’re far better off guys to miss a couple of inferences but to be dead-on accurate with what you did see then to be you know thorough and see all the inferences that are there but add a couple that weren’t actually true that’s the kiss of death on logic games and if you’re if you’re pressing so hard to see so much over and over guys that you’re making mistakes and you’re you’re you’re identifying things that aren’t actually true that poisons your questions it’s not gonna mean you’re not gonna get anything right but it definitely can haunt a lot of what you do if you don’t see everything but you’re seeing the basics and you’re getting better and maybe you miss an inference here and there usually you can pull that up in the questions a lot of times it’s not always going to be the end of the world in fact guys I still to this day don’t see all the inferences in most games especially the more difficult ones basic games yeah probably see all the ones that are pretty relevant but harder games I’ve got to see the basics I’m gonna see you know maybe some some very insightful inferences but there’s a lot of tricky ones I may not catch because they just don’t have time you got to get into the questions get points maybe those inferences don’t come up maybe they only come up once and I could just spend more time on the question fine okay but don’t press so hard guys that you’re sloppy and you’re making mistakes that is a problem okay so really look to avoid that okay let’s take a look at game number one [Music]

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